Pluristem’s Placenta-Derived Cells Could Cure A Slew Of Diseases, Prolong Life

By David Shamah, The Times of Israel August 02, 2015 Comments

This article was first published on The Times of Israel and was re-posted with permission.

A new study on Israeli-developed stem cells developed by Israeli biotech Pluristem shows they could help patients suffering from a wide array of physical injuries to live longer and healthier lives.

SEE ALSO: Technion Discovers Embryonic Stem Cells In Amniotic Sac

Israeli biotech Pluristem’s off-the-shelf PLacental eXpanded (PLX) cells, derived from harvested human placenta, have already been shown to be effective in ensuring that transplanted organs are assimilated by the body and in reversing nerve damage, and even in helping individuals afflicted with radiation disease recover.

The study, conducted by scientists at the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapy at Charité – University Medicine Berlin, showed “how PLX cells and other mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) influence the immune system in order to modulate immune reactions and to prevent immune reactions against the cells,” Pluristem said.

SEE ALSO: Researchers Identify Embryonic Stem Cell Renewal Mechanisms

The study showed “in vitro that MSC, and in particular PLX cells, control the induction of an immune response at several points” – essentially allowing doctors to regulate the immune system, speeding it up or slowing it down as needed.

The Berlin-Brandenburg Center is considered one of the world’s most important centers for interdisciplinary study of materials and factors which can be used to develop and implement innovative therapies and products for cell regeneration.

PLX is a commercial product developed by Haifa-based Pluristem based on mesenchymal stromal cells – a type of stem cell that can be used for numerous purposes in the body. MSCs have in particular been shown to be effective in interfering with the function of T-cells and their dendritic cell companions.

To continue reading this article on the TOI site, click here.

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